Spacecraft launches to study Sun's magnetic field

 作者:舒磊粹     |      日期:2019-02-26 01:12:03
By New Scientist Space and AFP Japan has successfully launched its Solar-B satellite to measure the Sun’s magnetic field. It will give scientists better knowledge of violent solar activity that affects the Earth. The satellite will get the most detailed look yet at the Sun’s magnetic fields. It will orbit the Earth for three years and spend three-quarters of the time in direct sunlight. The satellite was launched on Saturday from the Uchinoura Space Center in southern Japan in cooperation with the US and European space programmes, which will assess the data to complement their own research. The rocket carrying the satellite succeeded in putting the satellite into orbit, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency reported on its website. Data from the mission will also be analysed by the European Space Agency (ESA) at Norway’s Svalbard Islands in the Arctic Ocean, the only station on Earth that will be able to link with Solar-B at all times. Solar-B has three telescopes – one optical, one X-ray and one ultraviolet – that were designed with the US and Britain. “Solar-B represents a very important step for solar physics,” said ESA scientist Bernhard Fleck. “Solar-B will be able to study the solar magnetic field at scales smaller than ever before, and connect its behavior to the energetic and powerful processes at work on the Sun.” Sudden changes in the Sun’s magnetic field lines are thought to trigger eruptions of charged particles, called coronal mass ejections (CMEs), that can damage electronics on Earth-orbiting satellites, knock out power grids and pose a radiation hazard to astronauts. The satellite follows the Solar-A, also known by its Japanese name Yohkoh,